The Garden

The Garden

The Garden of the Phoenix is an extraordinary public space of great historical significance and natural beauty that is evolving within Jackson Park – a Garden inspired by Japan and reflecting over 120-years of U.S.-Japan relations within a pastoral landscape designed by Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1903), America’s foremost landscape architect and the chief of the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition’s landscape design.

During the years following the close of the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, the neo-classical buildings and canals of the famed “White City” were dismantled and Jackson Park was transformed into a rugged interconnected system of serene lagoons with lushly planted shores, islands, and peninsulas.

Central to the 1893 Exposition and today’s Jackson Park is the 15-acre Wooded Island, which includes at its north end the site of the lost Phoenix Pavilion (1893-1946) and a thriving Japanese garden called the Osaka Japanese Garden that was added during the 1930’s. Together, the Phoenix Pavilion and the Japanese garden represented one of the best examples of Japanese architecture and garden design outside of Japan.

Today, as we reflect upon the past, the site embarks on its next evolution as the "Garden of the Phoenix," with the planting of over 120 cherry trees in 2013 around the Columbian Basin and SKY LANDING by Yoko Ono on the original site of the Phoenix Pavilion (1893-1946) scheduled to open in 2016.